Mountain Setup | Mountain Sledder
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Mountain Sledder | August 20, 2018

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Mountain Setup | Mountain Sledder

Mountain Setup

Some of the obvious things that are different on
a mountain sled if you were converting (which is so expensive it’s simply not
worth it…) a flatland sled into a mountains sled would be riding position,
skis, bars, cooling, etc. etc.For starters, you stand on a mountain sled, so
raise your bars, and if you don’t have a mountain bar, it’s a very practical
thing many people find beneficial.  
The next would be footboards.
 Many people add aftermarket footboards to their machines to help get ride
of powder and increase grip!  

Low windshield is one of those things some might argue about, however I find it a necessity.  High visors throw snow at your face or chest while riding in deep pow.  Not only frustrating, but dangerous because you can’t see where your going, but the real reason I am not a fan is I roll my sled every day I go out, and not having to replace it daily is simply thinking ahead…
Next on the list is ski width.  Mountain riders tend to rock a narrower
stance to aid in maneuverability.   Sidehilling is a special talent and a narrow stance makes it much easier
to learn!  Along with the stance
come wider skis.  Seven inch seems
to be the industry standard for powder skis and carbides are optional out here,
a runner would suffice.Next is the oh mighty ‘snow flap’ (often referred to by
rednecks as the mud flap)…
This is that big anchor that hangs off the back of your machine to help it
cool.  Well if you ride in the
mountains in regularly deep snow, you have very little cooling issues, so cuts
that puppy down, it only gets in the way with reversing anyway…
No the things that aren’t that obvious are gearing and clutching.  I’d love to give you all the best
combos from each manufacturer however I have no idea, and it is simply
different depending on what little mods you have done already.  But as a general rule, track speed is
important, but you must be able to spin that track under load (going up hill),
and that is where the science comes into play.  Contact your local dealership for specific info on your
sled!I know the list can go on and on with venting, high air flow kits, suspension,
scratchers, etc, etc, but here are a few things to get your started.I’d be
stoked to see more ideas in the comments section!
Hope this helps guys!

 

 

 

Comments

thewayout14 says:

seat*

thewayout14 says:

a smaller and lighter seet benefits a mountain ride anytime